Arun Raghavan

Extremely pithy tagline here

TAG: collabora

Four years

Four years and what seems like a lifetime ago, I jumped aboard the ship Collabora Multimedia, and set sail for adventure and lands unknown. We sailed through strange new seas, to exotic lands, defeated many monsters, and, I feel, had some positive impact on the world around us. Last Friday, on my request, I got dropped back at the shore.

I’ve had an insanely fun time at Collabora, working with absurdly talented and dedicated people. Nevertheless, I’ve come to the point where I feel like I need something of a break. I’m not sure what’s next, other than a month or two of rest and relaxation — reading, cycling, travel, and catching up with some of the things I’ve been promising to do if only I had more time. Yes, that includes PulseAudio and GStreamer hacking as well. :-)

And there’ll be more updates and blog posts too!

PulseAudio 4.0 and more

And we’re back … PulseAudio 4.0 is out! There’s both a short and super-detailed changelog in the release notes. For the lazy, this release brings a bunch of Bluetooth stability updates, better low latency handling, performance improvements, and a whole lot more. :)

One interesting thing is that for this release, we kept a parallel next branch open while master was frozen for stabilising and releasing. As a result, we’re already well on our way to 5.0 with 52 commits since 4.0 already merged into master.

And finally, I’m excited to announce PulseAudio is going to be carrying out two great projects this summer, as part of the Google Summer of Code! We are going to have Alexander Couzens (lynxis) working on a rewrite of module-tunnel using libpulse, mentored by Tanu Kaskinen. In addition to this, Damir Jelić (poljar) working on improvements to resampling, mentored by Peter Meerwald.

That’s just some of the things to look forward to in coming months. I’ve got a few more things I’d like to write about, but I’ll save that for another post.

PulseConf 2012: Report

For those of you who missed my previous updates, we recently organised a PulseAudio miniconference in Copenhagen, Denmark last week. The organisation of all this was spearheaded by ALSA and PulseAudio hacker, David Henningsson. The good folks organising the Ubuntu Developer Summit / Linaro Connect were kind enough to allow us to colocate this event. A big thanks to both of them for making this possible!

The room where the first PulseAudio conference took place

The room where the first PulseAudio conference took place

The conference was attended by the four current active PulseAudio developers: Colin Guthrie, Tanu Kaskinen, David Henningsson, and myself. We were joined by long-time contributors Janos Kovacs and Jaska Uimonen from Intel, Luke Yelavich, Conor Curran and Michał Sawicz.

We started the conference at around 9:30 am on November 2nd, and actually managed to keep to the final schedule(!), so I’m going to break this report down into sub-topics for each item which will hopefully make for easier reading than an essay. I’ve also put up some photos from the conference on the Google+ event.

Mission and Vision

We started off with a broad topic — what each of our personal visions/goals for the project are. Interestingly, two main themes emerged: having the most seamless desktop user experience possible, and making sure we are well-suited to the embedded world.

Most of us expressed interest in making sure that users of various desktops had a smooth, hassle-free audio experience. In the ideal case, they would never need to find out what PulseAudio is!

Orthogonally, a number of us are also very interested in making PulseAudio a strong contender in the embedded space (mobile phones, tablets, set top boxes, cars, and so forth). While we already find PulseAudio being used in some of these, there are areas where we can do better (more in later topics).

There was some reservation expressed about other, less-used features such as network playback being ignored because of this focus. The conclusion after some discussion was that this would not be the case, as a number of embedded use-cases do make use of these and other “fringe” features.

Increasing patch bandwidth

Contributors to PulseAudio will be aware that our patch queue has been growing for the last few months due to lack of developer time. We discussed several ways to deal with this problem, the most promising of which was a periodic triage meeting.

We will be setting up a rotating schedule where each of us will organise a meeting every 2 weeks (the period might change as we implement things) where we can go over outstanding patches and hopefully clear backlog. Colin has agreed to set up the first of these.

Routing infrastructure

Next on the agenda was a presentation by Janos Kovacs about the work they’ve been doing at Intel with enhancing the PulseAudio’s routing infrastructure. These are being built from the perspective of IVI systems (i.e., cars) which typically have fairly complex use cases involving multiple concurrent devices and users. The slides for the talk will be put up here shortly (edit: slides are now available).

The talk was mingled with a Q&A type discussion with Janos and Jaska. The first item of discussion was consolidating Colin’s priority-based routing ideas into the proposed infrastructure. The broad thinking was that the ideas were broadly compatible and should be implementable in the new model.

There was also some discussion on merging the module-combine-sink functionality into PulseAudio’s core, in order to make 1:N routing easier. Some alternatives using te module-filter-* were proposed. Further discussion will likely be required before this is resolved.

The next steps for this work are for Jaska and Janos to break up the code into smaller logical bits so that we can start to review the concepts and code in detail and work towards eventually merging as much as makes sense upstream.

Low latency

This session was taken up against the background of improving latency for games on the desktop (although it does have other applications). The indicated required latency for games was given as 16 ms (corresponding to a frame rate of 60 fps). A number of ideas to deal with the problem were brought up.

Firstly, it was suggested that the maxlength buffer attribute when setting up streams could be used to signal a hard limit on stream latency — the client signals that it will prefer an underrun, over a latency above maxlength.

Another long-standing item was to investigate the cause of underruns as we lower latency on the stream — David has already begun taking this up on the LKML.

Finally, another long-standing issue is the buffer attribute adjustment done during stream setup. This is not very well-suited to low-latency applications. David and I will be looking at this in coming days.

Merging per-user and system modes

Tanu led the topic of finding a way to deal with use-cases such as mpd or multi-user systems, where access to the PulseAudio daemon of the active user by another user might be desired. Multiple suggestions were put forward, though a definite conclusion was not reached, as further thought is required.

Tanu’s suggestion was a split between a per-user daemon to manage tasks such as per-user configuration, and a system-wide daemon to manage the actual audio resources. The rationale being that the hardware itself is a common resource and could be handled by a non-user-specific daemon instance. This approach has the advantage of having a single entity in charge of the hardware, which keeps a part of the implementation simpler. The disadvantage is that we will either sacrifice security (arbitrary users can “eavesdrop” using the machine’s mic), or security infrastructure will need to be added to decide what users are allowed what access.

I suggested that since these are broadly fringe use-cases, we should document how users can configure the system by hand for these purposes, the crux of the argument being that our architecture should be dictated by the main use-cases, and not the ancillary ones. The disadvantage of this approach is, of course, that configuration is harder for the minority that wishes multi-user access to the hardware.

Colin suggested a mechanism for users to be able to request access from an “active” PulseAudio daemon, which could trigger approval by the corresponding “active” user. The communication mechanism could be the D-Bus system bus between user daemons, and Ștefan Săftescu’s Google Summer of Code work to allow desktop notifications to be triggered from PulseAudio could be used to get to request authorisation.

David suggested that we could use the per-user/system-wide split, modified somewhat to introduce the concept of a “system-wide” card. This would be a device that is configured as being available to the whole system, and thus explicitly marked as not having any privacy guarantees.

In both the above cases, discussion continued about deciding how the access control would be handled, and this remains open.

We will be continuing to look at this problem until consensus emerges.

Improving (laptop) surround sound

The next topic dealt with being able to deal with laptops with a built-in 2.1 channel set up. The background of this is that there are a number of laptops with stereo speakers and a subwoofer. These are usually used as stereo devices with the subwoofer implicitly being fed data by the audio controller in some hardware-dependent way.

The possibility of exposing this hardware more accurately was discussed. Some investigation is required to see how things are currently exposed for various hardware (my MacBook Pro exposes the subwoofer as a surround control, for example). We need to deal with correctly exposing the hardware at the ALSA layer, and then using that correctly in PulseAudio profiles.

This led to a discussion of how we could handle profiles for these. Ideally, we would have a stereo profile with the hardware dealing with upmixing, and a 2.1 profile that would be automatically triggered when a stream with an LFE channel was presented. This is a general problem while dealing with surround output on HDMI as well, and needs further thought as it complicates routing.

Testing

I gave a rousing speech about writing more tests using some of the new improvements to our testing framework. Much cheering and acknowledgement ensued.

Ed.: some literary liberties might have been taken in this section

Unified cross-distribution ALSA configuration

I missed a large part of this unfortunately, but the crux if the discussion was around unifying cross-distribution sound configuration for those who wish to disable PulseAudio.

Base volumes

The next topic we took up was base volumes, and whether they are useful to most end users. For those unfamiliar with the concept, we sometimes see sinks/sources where which support volume controls going to > 0dB (which is the no=attenuation point). We provide the maximum allowed gain in ALSA as the maximum volume, and suggest that UIs show a marker for the base volume.

It was felt that this concept was irrelevant, and probably confusing to most end users, and that we suggest that UIs do not show this information any more.

Relatedly, it was decided that having a per-port maximum volume configuration would be useful, so as to allow users to deal with hardware where the output might get too loud.

Devices with dynamic capabilities (HDMI)

Our next topic of discussion was finding a way to deal with devices such as those HDMI ports where the capabilities of the device could change at run time (for example, when you plug out a monitor and plug in a home theater receiver).

A few ideas to deal with this were discussed, and the best one seemed to be David’s proposal to always have a separate card for each HDMI device. The addition of dynamic profiles could then be exploited to only make profiles available when an actual device is plugged in (and conversely removed when the device is plugged out).

Splitting of configuration

It was suggested that we could split our current configuration files into three categories: core, policy and hardware adaptation. This was met with approval all-around, and the pre-existing ability to read configuration from subdirectories could be reused.

Another feature that was desired was the ability to ship multiple configurations for different hardware adaptations with a single package and have the correct one selected based on the hardware being run on. We did not know of a standard, architecture-independent way to determine hardware adaptation, so it was felt that the first step toward solving this problem would be to find or create such a mechanism. This could either then be used to set up configuration correctly in early boot, or by PulseAudio for do runtime configuration selection.

Relatedly, moving all distributed configuration to /usr/share/..., with overrides in /etc/pulse/... and $HOME were suggested.

Better drain/underrun reporting

David volunteered to implement a per-sink-input timer for accurately determining when drain was completed, rather than waiting for the period of the entire buffer as we currently do. Unsurprisingly, no objections were raised to this solution to the long-standing issue.

In a similar vein, redefining the underflow event to mean a real device underflow (rather than the client-side buffer running empty) was suggested. After some discussion, we agreed that a separate event for device underruns would likely be better.

Beer

We called it a day at this point and dispersed beer-wards.

PulseConf Hackers

Our valiant attendees after a day of plotting the future of PulseAudio

User experience

David very kindly invited us to spend a day after the conference hacking at his house in Lund, Sweden, just a short hop away from Copenhagen. We spent a short while in the morning talking about one last item on the agenda — helping to build a more seamless user experience. The idea was to figure out some tools to help users with problems quickly converge on what problem they might be facing (or help developers do the same). We looked at the Ubuntu apport audio debugging tool that David has written, and will try to adopt it for more general use across distributions.

Hacking

The rest of the day was spent in more discussions on topics from the previous day, poring over code for some specific problems, and rolling out the first release candidate for the upcoming 3.0 release.

And cut!

I am very happy that this conference happened, and am looking forward to being able to do it again next year. As you can see from the length of this post, there are lot of things happening in this part of the stack, and lots more yet to come. It was excellent meeting all the fellow PulseAudio hackers, and my thanks to all of them for making it.

Finally, I wouldn’t be sitting here writing this report without support from Collabora, who sponsored my travel to the conference, so it’s fitting that I end this with a shout-out to them. :)

PulseConf Schedule

David has now published a tentative schedule for the PulseAudio Mini-conference (I’m just going to call it PulseConf — so much easier on the tongue).

For the lazy, these are some of the topics we’ll be covering:

  • Vision and mission — where we are and where we want to be
  • Improving our patch review process
  • Routing infrastructure
  • Improving low latency behaviour
  • Revisiting system- and user-modes
  • Devices with dynamic capabilities
  • Improving surround sound behaviour
  • Separating configuration for hardware adaptation
  • Better drain/underrun reporting behaviour

Phew — and there are more topics that we probably will not have time to deal with!

For those of you who cannot attend, the Linaro Connect folks (who are graciously hosting us) are planning on running Google+ Hangouts for their sessions. Hopefully we should be able to do the same for our proceedings. Watch this space for details!

p.s.: A big thank you to my employer Collabora for sponsoring my travel to the conference.

PulseAudio 2.0: Twice The Goodness!

That’s right, it’s finally out! Thanks go out to all our contributors for the great work (there’s too many — see the shortlog!). The highlights of the release follow. Head over to the announcement or release notes for more details.

  • Dynamic sample rate switching by Pierre-Louis Bossart: This makes PulseAudio even more power efficient.

  • Jack detection by David Henningsson: Separate volumes for your laptop speakers and headphones, and more stuff coming soon.

  • Major echo canceller improvements by me: Based on the WebRTC.org audio processing library, we now do better echo cancellation, remove the need to fiddle with the mic volume knob and have fixed AEC between laptop speakers and a USB webcam mic.

  • A virtual surround module by Niels Ole Salscheider: Try it out for some virtual surround sound shininess!

  • Support for Xen guests by Giorgos Boutsiouki: Should make audio virtualisation in guests more efficient.

We don't always make a release, but when we do, it's awesome

Special thanks from me to Collabora for giving me some time for upstream work.

Packages are available on Gentoo, Arch, and probably soon on other distributions if they’re not already there.

PulseAudio on Android: Part 2

Some of you might’ve noticed that there has been a bunch of work happening here at Collabora on making cool open source technologies such as GStreamer, Telepathy, Wayland and of course, PulseAudio available on Android.

Since my last blog post on this subject, I got some time to start looking at replacing AudioFlinger (recap: that’s Android’s native audio subsystem) with PulseAudio (recap: that’s the awesome Linux audio subsystem). This work can be broken up into 3 parts: playback, capture, and policy. The roles of playback and capture are obvious. For those who aren’t aware of system internals, the policy bits take care of audio routing, volumes, and other such things. For example, audio should play out of your headphones if they’re plugged in, off Bluetooth if you’ve got a headset paired, or the speakers if nothing’s plugged in. Also, depending on the device, the output volume might change based on the current output path.

I started by looking at solving the playback problem first. I’ve got the first 80% of this done (as we all know, the second 80% takes at least as long ;) ). This is done by replacing the native AudioTrack playback API with a simple wrapper that translates into the libpulse PulseAudio client API. There’s bits of the API that seem to be rarely used(loops and markers, primarily), and I’ve not gotten around to those yet. Basic playback works quite well, and here’s a video showing this. (Note: this and the next video will be served with yummy HTML5 goodness if you enabled the YouTube HTML5 beta).

(if the video doesn’t appear, you can watch it on YouTube)

Users of PulseAudio might have spotted that this now frees us up to do some fairly nifty things. One such thing is getting remote playback for free. For a long time now, there has been support for streaming audio between devices running PulseAudio. I wrote up a quick app to show this working on the Galaxy Nexus as well. Again, seeing this working is a lot more impressive than me describing it here, so here’s another video:

(if the video doesn’t appear, you can watch it on YouTube)

This is all clearly work in progress, but you can find the code for the AudioTrack wrapper as a patch for now. This will be a properly integrated tree that you can just pull and easily integrate into your Android build when it’s done. The PA Output Switcher app code is also available in a git repository.

I’m hoping to be able to continue hacking on the capture and policy bits. The latter, especially, promises to be involved, since there isn’t always a 1:1 mapping between AudioFlinger and PulseAudio concepts. Nothing insurmountable, though. :) Watch this space for more updates as I wade through the next bit.

PulseAudio vs. AudioFlinger: Fight!

I’ve been meaning to try this for a while, and we’ve heard a number of requests from the community as well. Recently, I got some time here at Collabora to give it a go — that is, to get PulseAudio running on an Android device and see how it compares with Android’s AudioFlinger.

The Contenders

Let’s introduce our contenders first. For those who don’t know, PulseAudio is pretty much a de-facto standard part of the Linux audio stack. It sits on top of ALSA which provides a unified way to talk to the audio hardware and provides a number of handy features that are useful on desktops and embedded devices. I won’t rehash all of these, but this includes a nice modular framework, a bunch of power saving features, flexible routing, and lots more. PulseAudio runs as a daemon, and clients usually use the libpulse library to communicate with it.

In the other corner, we have Android’s native audio system — AudioFlinger. AudioFlinger was written from scratch for Android. It provides an API for playback/recording as well as a control mechanism for implementing policy. It does not depend on ALSA, but instead allows for a sort of HAL that vendors can implement any way they choose. Applications generally play audio via layers built on top of AudioFlinger. Even if you write a native application, it would use OpenSL ES implementation which goes through AudioFlinger. The actual service runs as a thread of the mediaserver daemon, but this is merely an implementation detail.

Note: all my comments about AudioFlinger and Android in general are based on documentation and code for Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich).

The Arena

My test-bed for the tests was the Galaxy Nexus running Android 4.0 which we shall just abbreviate to ICS. I picked ICS since it is the current platform on which Google is building, and hopefully represents the latest and greatest in AudioFlinger development. The Galaxy Nexus runs a Texas Instruments OMAP4 processor, which is also really convenient since this chip has pretty good support for running stock Linux (read on to see how useful this was).

Preparations

The first step in getting PulseAudio on Android was deciding between using the Android NDK like a regular application or integrate into the base Android system. I chose the latter — even though this was a little more work initially, it made more sense in the long run since PulseAudio really belongs to the base-system.

The next task was to get the required dependencies ported to Android. Fortunately, a lot of the ground work for this was already done by some of the awesome folks at Collabora. Derek Foreman’s androgenizer tool is incredibly handy for converting an autotools-based build to Android–friendly makefiles. With Reynaldo Verdejo and Alessandro Decina’s prior work on GStreamer for Android as a reference, things got even easier.

The most painful bit was libltdl, which we use for dynamically loading modules. Once this was done, the other dependencies were quite straightforward to port over. As a bonus, the Android source already ships an optimised version of Speex which we use for resampling, and it was easy to reuse this as well.

As I mentioned earlier, vendors can choose how they implement their audio abstraction layer. On the Galaxy Nexus, this is built on top of standard ALSA drivers, and the HAL talks to the drivers via a minimalist tinyalsa library. My first hope was to use this, but there was a whole bunch of functions missing that PulseAudio needed. The next approach was to use salsa-lib, which is a stripped down version of the ALSA library written for embedded devices. This too had some missing functions, but these were fewer and easy to implement (and are now upstream).

Now if only life were that simple. :) I got PulseAudio running on the Galaxy Nexus with salsa-lib, and even got sound out of the HDMI port. Nothing from the speakers though (they’re driven by a TI twl6040 codec). Just to verify, I decided to port the full alsa-lib and alsa-utils packages to debug what’s happening (by this time, I’m familiar enough with androgenizer for all this to be a breeze). Still no luck. Finally, with some pointers from the kind folks at TI (thanks Liam!), I got current UCM configuration files for OMAP4 boards, and some work-in-progress patches to add UCM support to PulseAudio, and after a couple of minor fixes, wham! We have output. :)

(For those who don’t know about UCM — embedded chips are quite different from desktops and expose a huge amount of functionality via ALSA mixer controls. UCM is an effort to have a standard, meaningful way for applications and users to use these.)

In production, it might be handy to write light-weight UCM support for salsa-lib or just convert the UCM configuration into PulseAudio path/profile configuration (bonus points if it’s an automated tool). For our purposes, though, just using alsa-lib is good enough.

To make the comparison fair, I wrote a simple test program that reads raw PCM S16LE data from a file and plays it via the AudioTrack interface provided by AudioFlinger or the PulseAudio Asynchronous API. Tests were run with the brightness fixed, wifi off, and USB port connected to my laptop (for adb shell access).

All tests were run with the CPU frequency pegged at 350 MHz and with 44.1 and 48 kHz samples. Five readings were recorded, and the median value was finally taken.

Round 1: CPU

First, let’s take a look at how the two compare in terms of CPU usage. The numbers below are the percentage CPU usage taken as the sum of all threads of the audio server process and the audio thread in the client application using top (which is why the granularity is limited to an integer percentage).

44.1 kHz 48 kHz
AF PA AF PA
1% 1% 2% 0%

At 44.1 kHz, the two are essentially the same. Both cases are causing resampling to occur (the native sample rate for the device is 48 kHz). Resampling is done using the Speex library, and we’re seeing minuscule amounts of CPU usage even at 350 MHz, so it’s clear that the NEON optimisations are really paying off here.

The astute reader would have noticed that since the device’ native sample rate is 48 kHz, the CPU usage for 48 kHz playback should be less than for 44.1 kHz. This is true with PulseAudio, but not with AudioFlinger! The reason for this little quirk is that AudioFlinger provides 44.1 kHz samples to the HAL (which means the stream is resampled there), and then the HAL needs to resample it again to 48 kHz to bring it to the device’ native rate. From what I can tell, this is a matter of convention with regards to what audio HALs should expect from AudioFlinger (do correct me if I’m mistaken about the rationale).

So round 1 leans slightly in favour of PulseAudio.

Round 2: Memory

Comparing the memory consumption of the server process is a bit meaningless, because the AudioFlinger daemon thread shares an address space with the rest of the mediaserver process. For the curious, the resident set size was: AudioFlinger — 6,796 KB, PulseAudio — 3,024 KB. Again, this doesn’t really mean much.

We can, however, compare the client process’ memory consumption. This is RSS in kilobytes, measured using top.

44.1 kHz 48 kHz
AF PA AF PA
2600 kB 3020 kB 2604 kB 3020 kB

The memory consumption is comparable between the two, but leans in favour of AudioFlinger.

Round 3: Power

I didn’t have access to a power monitor, so I decided to use a couple of indirect metrics to compare power utilisation. The first of these is PowerTOP, which is actually a Linux desktop tool for monitoring various power metrics. Happily, someone had already ported PowerTOP to Android. The tool reports, among other things, the number of wakeups-from-idle per second for the processor as a whole, and on a per-process basis. Since there are multiple threads involved, and PowerTOP’s per-process measurements are somewhat cryptic to add up, I used the global wakeups-from-idle per second. The “Idle” value counts the number of wakeups when nothing is happening. The actual value is very likely so high because the device is connected to my laptop in USB debugging mode (lots of wakeups from USB, and the device is prevented from going into a full sleep).

44.1 kHz 48 kHz
Idle AF PA AF PA
79.6 107.8 87.3 108.5 85.7

The second, similar, data point is the number of interrupts per second reported by vmstat. These corroborate the numbers above:

44.1 kHz 48 kHz
Idle AF PA AF PA
190 266 215 284 207

PulseAudio’s power-saving features are clearly highlighted in this comparison. AudioFlinger causes about three times the number of wakeups per second that PulseAudio does. Things might actually be worse on older hardware with less optimised drivers than the Galaxy Nexus (I’d appreciate reports from running similar tests on a Nexus S or any other device with ALSA support to confirm this).

For those of you who aren’t familiar with PulseAudio, the reason we manage to get these savings is our timer-based scheduling mode. In this mode, we fill up the hardware buffer as much as possible and go to sleep (disabling ALSA interrupts while we’re at it, if possibe). We only wake up when the buffer is nearing empty, and fill it up again. More details can be found in this old blog post by Lennart.

Round 4: Latency

I’ve only had the Galaxy Nexus to actually try this out with, but I’m pretty certain I’m not the only person seeing latency issues on Android. On the Galaxy Nexus, for example, the best latency I can get appears to be 176 ms. This is pretty high for certain types of applications, particularly ones that generate tones based on user input.

With PulseAudio, where we dynamically adjust buffering based on what clients request, I was able to drive down the total buffering to approximately 20 ms (too much lower, and we started getting dropouts). There is likely room for improvement here, and it is something on my todo list, but even out-of-the-box, we’re doing quite well.

Round 5: Features

With the hard numbers out of the way, I’d like to talk a little bit about what else PulseAudio brings to the table. In addition to a playback/record API, AudioFlinger provides mechanism for enforcing various bits of policy such as volumes and setting the “active” device amongst others. PulseAudio exposes similar functionality, some as part of the client API and the rest via the core API exposed to modules.

From SoC vendors’ perspective, it is often necessary to support both Android and standard Linux on the same chip. Being able to focus only on good quality ALSA drivers and knowing that this will ensure quality on both these systems would be a definite advantage in this case.

The current Android system leaves power management to the audio HAL. This means that each vendor needs to implement this themselves. Letting PulseAudio manage the hardware based on requested latencies and policy gives us a single point of control, greatly simplifying the task of power-management and avoiding code duplication.

There are a number of features that PulseAudio provides that can be useful in the various scenarios where Android is used. For example, we support transparently streaming audio over the network, which could be a handy way of supporting playing audio from your phone on your TV completely transparently and out-of-the-box. We also support compressed formats (AC3, DTS, etc.) which the ongoing Android-on-your-TV efforts could likely take advantage of.

Edit: As someone pointed out on LWN, I missed one thing — AudioFlinger has an effect API that we do not yet have in PulseAudio. It’s something I’d definitely like to see added to PulseAudio in the future.

Ding! Ding! Ding!

That pretty much concludes the comparison of these two audio daemons. Since the Android-side code is somewhat under-documented, I’d welcome comments from readers who are familiar with the code and history of AudioFlinger.

I’m in the process of pushing all the patches I’ve had to write to the various upstream projects. A number of these are merely build system patches to integrate with the Android build system, and I’m hoping projects are open to these. Instructions on building this code will be available on the PulseAudio Android wiki page.

For future work, it would be interesting to write a wrapper on top of PulseAudio that exposes the AudioFlinger audio and policy APIs — this would basically let us run PulseAudio as a drop-in AudioFlinger replacement. In addition, there are potential performance benefits that can be derived from using Android-specific infrastructure such as Binder (for IPC) and ashmem (for transferring audio blocks as shared memory segments, something we support on desktops using the standard Linux SHM mechanism which is not available on Android).

If you’re an OEM who is interested in this work, you can get in touch with us — details are on the Collabora website.

I hope this is useful to some of you out there!

i’m in yur analog gain, controlling it

Longish day, but I did want to post something fun before going to sleep — I just pushed out patches to hook up the WebRTC folks’ analog gain control to PulseAudio. So your mic will automatically adjust the input level based on how loud you’re speaking. It’s quite quick to adapt if you’re too loud, but a bit slow when the input signal is too soft. This isn’t bad, since the former is a much bigger problem than the latter.

Also, we’ve switched to the WebRTC canceller as the default canceller (you can still choose the Speex canceller manually, though). Overall, the quality is pretty good. I’d do a demo, but it’s effectively had zero learning time in my tests, so we’re not too far from a stage where this is a feature that, if we’re doing it right you won’t notice it exists.

There lot’s of things, big and small that need to be added and tweaked, but this does go some way towards bringing a hassle-free VoIP experience on Linux closer to reality. Once again, kudos to the folks at Google for the great work and for opening up this code. Also a shout-out to fellow Collaboran Sjoerd Simons for bouncing ideas and giving me those much-needed respites from talking to myself. :)